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In a rare fit of brilliance I followed the service agent's advice and had the throttle body cleaned by the service department of our local Volvo agent.

I left the S80 with them at 7.30am. Walked into town and had breakfast at McDonalds. Car all finished at 10.30am. Cost NZ$200.00 with Volvo Owners discount.

The technician cleaned out:

carbon
oil
grease
last week's rice pudding
two bird's nests
one Sushi
Nov 97 Playboy centrefold

It's a great feeling having your car serviced by Volvo trained engineer's. Got it right first time


The car is performing brilliantly now. Very smooth and very responsive.
 

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I need to spend a ton of money to maintain four of my cars/van whenever I bring them to dealers. So far, I did most of DIY maintenance by myself (1 GM station wagon, Ford Escort, Ford Taurus, Mercury Villager, Two Toyota Camrys, 1 Lexus ES300 and a Volvo S80), and saved a lot of money. I got excellent advices from the best of many experts from many countries in the world. In my past experience, all of the cars/van didn't have any problems if I took care of them a little bit (like synthetic oil change every 5k mile, transmission oil flush at 60k mile, starter/alternator rebuilt around 100k mile, belt, belt tensioner, water pump, brake, tune up and air filter change, etc). In fact, all of my domestic cars/van ran the same or better than imports. A lot of people don't even change engine oil/drive belt, and complain so much.

I brought my cars several times to local mechanics, and they usually tried to cheat me. I was so disappointed after waiting so many hours, and started to maintain my cars by myself. For example, I've been to a local Volvo Indi shop, and could not find any new models (all I saw that day were old 240s, 850s, etc.). I always try to use genuine parts and buy them cheap from internet sites. I was really shocked by a stupid friend of mine who tried to put cheap $20 brake pad on his daughter's car. I refused to helping his brake job since I might get blamed soon (most probably something will break very soon and it's not safe).

So far, I did followings for preventative mainteance for my 1999 S80 NA.
1) Removed and installed a rebuilt ABS module (rebuilt by Vitor), and saved around $700
2) New front and rear brake pad, and rear parking brake shoe replacement
3) Installed new timing belt, hydraulic tensioner, idler pulley, serpentine belt, serpentine belt tensioner. Saved a big money
4) air/cabin filter replacement, and cleaned MAF sensor
5) rear splash guard installation and glued a drive side mirror
6) Volvo coolant replacement
7) Transmission oil flush, a lot of small maintenance like putting new rivets, etc.
8) Mobil 1 synthetic oil change at every 5000 mile.

My S80 runs strong and smooth although this 1999 NA model has around 105k miles on it. I just want to clean a throttle plate and oil trap vent hoses before something happens. It may take one or two hours to clean throttle plate and vent tube first time, but I can cut it half next time (or after every 20k mile). Besides, my Volvo dealers are selling Volvo and Subaru, etc. I am not very much impressed by those mechanics in my local dealers (although the dealer was a lot better than many local shops). I have been there twice to clear a check engine light and to make an extra key (I could clear it at an Autozone part store free).
 

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I removed ten bolts to remove the upper intake manifold, and then blocked 6 air induction holes in the lower intake manifold with gentle clothes not to drop anything in there. I also removed two vaccum hoses from the driver side of the uppper intake manifold.

I was very surprised that I couldn't find any oil deposites in the ETM throttle plate. The ETM plate was pretty clean, and I didn't have any idle issues (I just did it for preventative maintenace).

Anyway, I used a can of Valvoline synthetic carburator cleaner to clean up the throttle plate and around the hole. I also found some dust in air induction holes (upper and lower intake manifolds), and cleaned up with the carburator cleaner.

I put a new upper intake manifold gasket, and torqued several steps to 17 NM (150 inch-lb) when tightening the upper intake mounting bolts.

Why my ETM plate is so clean? Does this mean the first ower alreay replace this ETM (the ETM has a white label on it)? I am the second owner, and My son put about 10,000 miles since I bought this 99 S80 NA (now it has about 105k miles on it). I need to check out my ETM repair history when dropping by a local Volvo dealer. Thanks.
 
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