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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tech,
I typed in my 99 S80 2.9L non-turbo VIN numbers to the VADIS DVD, and a hydraulic tensioner in timing belt replacement section was found based on the VADIS. I thought a mechanical tensioner was used since the later 98. I still could not believe this, and typed in several more 99 year model S80 (including turbo) to VADIS. I got all of these VIN information from Ebay auction. All of the 99 year models I typed in have a hydaulic tensioner. A mechanical tensioner was used from the 2000 year model (based on VIN ids from Ebay auction).

Is there a simple way to open the timing belt cover to look at the timing belt tensioner. Are there any benefits of using a mechanical tensioner (over the hydraulic tensioner)? Or, is this simply related cost reduction ? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I used several more VIN numbers of 1998 and 1999 year model S70s found at the Ebay to input a vehicle profile in the VADIS. A mechanical tensioner was used all of the 1999 S70s and some of 1998 year model S70s. Some of 1998 model year S70 still have a hydraulic tensioner. I am more believing the VADIS information now. Thanks.
 

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To find out which tensioner you have you will have to remove the timing cover.First remove the end spark plug cover.If yours is turbo which I dont remember you will have to remove the turbo induction pipes first.then remove the timing cover and then look.If it is hydraulic it will look like a small cylinder.If it is not you will see the little tabs for adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tech,
I removed the end spark cover by removing two 30mm torx screws, and then pulled it out by prying two tabs a little bit. But, I couldn't see anyting from the end spark cover. Do I need to remove coolant and PS fluid reservoirs to remove the timing cover? How many screws need to be removed on the timing cover? Do I need to do anything special after removing the screws on the timing cover? BTW, I found the following from the timing cover.

Engine: B6304S3
S/N: 1597xxx

I have read the B6304S3 was used only the 99 S80 2.9L non-turbo model (B6304F -> S90/V90, 960). From 2000 model, B6294S engine was used for 2.9L non-turbo S80. Can you tell which tensioner is used in the B6304S3 engine? Thanks.
 

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You can remove the resiviors by just pulling up on them.There is only 1 screw holding the timing cover on.Its either a 12mm or 10mm head on the bolt.Then the cover will just slide straight up.You don't have a coolant hose that goes into the timing cover do you?I think they are only on the later models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tech, I first removed the end spark cover. I cut a plastic tie which holds a small upper power steering hose, and also disconnected the coolant level sensor wire by pulling out the connector after pressing down the little tab. I also removed the small coolant overflow hose. There is a coolant hose that passes through the timing belt cover on the firewall side. I pulled up the coolant and power steering reservoirs, and put two reservoirs on the engine top end.

I pulled out the timing belt cover after removing one 10 mm bolt, and saw a long cylinder which is a hydraulic tensoner. I spent some time to put the timing cover back. I confirmed my 1999 S80 2.9L non-turbo engine (B6304S3) had a hydraulic tensioner.

The timing belt and serpentine belt look like pretty new (no cracks) although my S80 has 97k miles. The water pump color has pretty shiny silver like a brand new aluminum. The water pump color looks a lot different than other adjacent aluminum parts which have dark dirty old aluminum color. I thought the water pump had been replaced by the first owner. But, there is some rust on the idler pulley and tensioner pulley. I may need to use some WD40 to remove the rust. Or, I may put a new idler pulley which only costs around $40. I will to put a new timing belt and a new $2 plastic which prevents the valve to piston crash (when the tensioner fails) to the hydraulic tensioner. I hope I can reuse the hydraulic tensioner.

I still have several more questions for you. I think I can put a new timing belt since I don't need to adjust tension when using the hydraulic tensioner. In the mean time, I would like to order a cam spoke lock device to lock variable intake and exhaust cam shafts. The device is affordable ($45).
 

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You can reuse the tensioner you just have to compress it and install a pin to hold it compressed.That tool is a good thing to have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Tech,
I think I can use a 6 or 7 inch c-clamp (which I usually compress brake pads to take them out from calipers) to slowly compress the hydraulic tensioner. And then put a 2mm allen wrench into a hole in the hydraulic tensioner to lock the position. I don't want to buy a special tool to use it one time only.

I am little confused by the following instructions.
1. Turn crankshaft clockwise until No. 1 cylinder at TDC of compression stroke, with crankshaft sprocket timing marks are aligned. Ensure camshaft sprocket timing marks are aligned. So far so good.

2. Turn the crankshaft a further 1/4 turn clockwise and then back again until the timing marks are aligned. I am confused by this paragraph. I can interpret this as "Turn the crankshaft a further 90 degree clockwise, and then turn back the crankshaft COUNTER-CLOCKWISE until the timing marks aligned".
I have read "not to turn the crankshaft COUNTER-CLOCKWISE". Is this counter-clockwise turn is ok for variable valve timing only?

Do I have to turn the accessory belt idler bolt counter-clockwise to release the drive belt? Thanks.
 

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The paragraph I think refers to the manual tensioner.Just turn till the timing marks line up and you will be fine.Yes the accessories idler goes clockwise.I usually use a long wrench and pull towards the front of the car and hold with a bungie cord to help remove and install the serp belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Where did you hang the other end of the bunge cord? Is a 2 feet bunge cord enough to hold the closed end of the wrench (or the TB tensioner pulley)? I could not find a long closed end wrench at local autoparts. I would like to know the wrench size and length also. Do you know the size of the crankshaft pulley nut/bolt? Is a 30 mm nut? Thanks.
 

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I think the bolt you pull on on the tensioner is a 14mm.I have a master serpentine belt tool so im not sure of the length.You should be able to find a cheap serpentine belt tool.I hook the other end of the bungie to the radiator support.I believe the crank shaft nut is 30mm I always use my 11/4 socket.Check when you start pulling everything apart you might not have to remove the nut.You might be able to remove the 4 13mm bolts and remove the outside half of the pulley and have enough room to remove the timing belt as well as the serpentine belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks, Tech.
I am not going to take off the crankshaft pulley, but I need to get a right socket to turn the crankshaft to align timing marks. The Volvo inline 6 engine looks great, and it's easier to change spark plugs, and a timing belt than doing in a V6 engine. I can even put a new timing belt without loosening the crankshaft pulley, and put a water pump without taking out the cam sprockets. But, the only concern I have is a S80 somehow overdesigned, and most of owners probably don't care about an electric throttle or a mechanical throttle as long as it doesn't breaks. Thanks again.
 
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