Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )


Hello, we have answers for your Volvo-related questions!. Why not take a few moments to ask a question, help provide a solution or just engage in a conversation with another member in any one of our forums. Together we can make our Volvo community a better place.
 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Do you like Volvo-Forums.com? Link to us and help spread the word about our forum. Thanks!
> Fuel Filter Change On Volvo 240, Lessons Learned
NightSailor
post May 12 2011, 08:43 PM
Post #1


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 26
Joined: 31-May 10
Member No.: 73,465
Status: Offline
Location: ISA
Drives: 1992 Volvo 240



I bought a Volvo 240 5 speed sedan a few years ago for my teenager when she turned 16. She didn't get her license for a year, so I drove and and fell in love with that 5 speed. I decided that I wanted one of my own, only a wagon. There are only a few cars that I would buy with over 200,000 miles. Both of these cars had high mileage. The sedan was purchased with 217,000 miles and extensive maintenance records and the wagon has 231,000 miles--with few records. I plan to keep the wagon for the rest of my life. The sedan we will probably keep in the family too.

So with the idea of keeping these two vehicles long term, I began going through every system. This week's maintenance task was fuel filter replacement. Understand that these car are 17 years old, and high mileage, so my procedure is for people like me, who might have bought cheap older Volvo 240s, and want to keep them going another 20 years. Parts have more corrosion and more needs to be replaced than just a filter. I read up on this before starting and found the job to be more difficult than expected. So here is my procedure for a nasty corroded mess of a filter change.

Volvo 240 Fuel Filter Replacement.

1. On level ground, jack up the car with a floor jack and place two jack stands under the rear axle. Lower the floor jack and then pump it back up to take some of the weight of the car so that the car is fully supported and in no danger of falling off the jack stands.

2. Disconnect the battery at the positive terminal. Ensure the battery cable cannot possibly make contact with the positive terminal.

3. Place several absorbent towels under the fuel pump. This is located on the bottom of the car, in front of the drivers side rear tire.

4. Remove the two bolts shown on the top of the below picture. Allow the rear bracket to bend and support this assembly as it hangs down. I used a 12mm deep socket on a 3/8 drive ratchet. A standard height socket with an extension would work.

(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1534.jpg)

5. This next picture was taken after the new fuel filter was installed and is used for illustration purposes.

If you can, go ahead and remove the fuel pump inlet and outlet flanges, and slide in a new filter. The inlet is a 19mm and the outlet is a 17mm.

If the filter is very old and these parts a corroded mess---do not loosen these flange bolts on either end of the fuel filter, with the fuel filter installed in the car. I feel it is best to remove it from the car instead. If the filter has been on a long time and the last guy tightened the piss out of it--it will not come off easy. What will happen is you will pop the filter and pump bracket off the support bracket. That is attached by three rubber feet, and they are awkward to put back on. You can see one of the three rubber feet just below the short fuel line at the bottom of the below picture. If the rubber feet pop off secure to the plate that mounts the pump and filter first, and then work them onto the lower mounting plate.

There was no way, I'd get the filter out by the normal method.

I cut the short fuel line in between the fuel pump on the right and the fuel filter on the left. Cost to replace for this assembly is $52 from Volvo. You might be able to find some metric hose that will fit. It is smaller than 1/4 inch. Good luck finding something that will work. Perhaps you can pull a fuel line off a junk Volvo and snip out a piece. Heat it, away from any fuel, to help slide it on.

Snip the fuel line at the outlet as close to the nipple as possible. If you cut the fuel line leading to the engine too short, you will have to replace that line. Volvo cost is about $72. I was considering replacing this with metal fuel line. The Volvo part will not rust, and it is protected from the sun so it should last a long time.

I used a 10mm socket on a 1/4" drive ratchet to loosen the clamp that secures the fuel filter.

Slide the filter aft to remove it.
(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1529.jpg)
6. Detach the two wires and push them out of the way. Snipping this short fuel line in two. I used an adjustable wrench on the inner nut to remove the fuel pump fitting. Use rags to absorb any spilled fuel. Remove rags from the work area, and replace with fresh rags if needed. Avoid sparks, obviously.

New Part below
(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1523.jpg)

Here is the side that attaches to the Fuel Pump. Note the copper washer. The Volvo Parts manual does not show this part, but Volvo dealers stock it. It is worth replacing, which means bringing it with you to match it up. I was able to reuse this copper washer on both cars, but I was uneasy about this. I did not have this part the first time and it worked, so I tried it again with the sedan and it did not leak. Still I recommend replacing it.

Take a good look at the condition of this part. It looks pretty bad on the outside. I was unable to slip a 17 mm wrench over the inner nut.
(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1526.jpg)

This is the part the new assembly attaches to on the Fuel Pump. Truthfully, if I had to do it over again,
I'd replace the fuel pump and this part as well. That is even more costly, but given the age of these part and the critical nature of the functions they perform, it is money well spent.

7. Loosen the 10mm bolt to remove the fuel filter by pulling it towards the back of the car. If the rubber is stuck to the filter you may have to remove the bolt completely and peel the clamp apart to remove the filter. Note the fuel flows from the fuel pump through the short hose to the fuel filter towards the back of the car, and then it comes out of the back of the filter and goes to the engine.
(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1520.jpg)

8. Now you have the filter out of the car. At this point you will more fuel may leak out. Change your rags and remove from your work area.

I take the filter and drain the rest of the fuel out on a sandy patch of ground so it can evaporate. There should not be much fuel in the filter at this point. Obviously, you still need to treat it carefully, as the fumes can catch fire with a spark.

9. Both ends of the filter were very hard to remove. I placed the entire filter in a vise and still used an adjustable wrench on the filter flange and a 17mm wrench to remove one fitting and a 19mm for the other. Typically I like to open up filters and inspect them on my diesels, but I resisted the temptation to cut these in half--heat could ignite a fire. If you want to inspect them, I'd fill them with water first and then empty, and perhaps let them sit in the sun a while before cutting them open. This filter came off the sedan and did not look as bad as the wagon. Both should have been replaced more often. I think the interval is 30,000 miles between changes.

10. Install new washers on the outlet flange and tighten it up. These sometimes come with the fuel filter. Don't buy a filter without them, and don't replace the filter without new copper washers or it will leak and you will have to take it apart and do it over. Note that the washer are different on the outflow and inlet sides and that you need two on each hollow flange. Only four are needed for the fuel filter, and one for the fuel pump.

Put a few drops of oil on the outflow nipple and jam the fuel line that leads to the engine on the nipple. This will be a tight fit, and you will need oil to get it on. Twist it back and forth until it is firmly seated. Try to seat it all the way on, as far as it will go. Twist it such that the flange will line up with the fuel filter when installed. You do not want any kinks in the fuel line. This fuel pump looks like crap. They last a long time, but it would have been a good idea to replace this one at this time.

Slide the fuel filter roughly into place. Do not tighten the 10mm bolt yet, but it should be screwed on enough such that it can easily be tightened later, and the fuel filter can slide forward and aft. Make sure the outlet fuel line has a fair lead with no kinking.

(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1525.jpg)

11. Re-attach short fuel line assembly to the fuel filter. I used an adjustable wrench, my 17mm would not slide over it. Use a 17mm to tighten the other nut while making sure the fuel line, lines up with the fuel filter. In the below picture I have not yet tighten up the fuel filter side. You can clearly see the two copper washers on the fuel filter inlet fitting. Those washers should match the indentation in the crown of the fuel filter. The right size washer is key and the Volvo service manual lists the wrong part number for one of these--I'm pretty sure it was the inlet side shown below.
(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1529.jpg)

12. Put an adjustable wrench on the fuel filter and a 19mm wrench on the hose inlet fitting and tighten it down.

13. Make sure the short fuel line is straight and adjust fuel filter fore and aft for this. Tighten 10mm bolt that secures the fuel filter.

14. Reattach the two wires to the fuel pump. Note one is light and one is dark, and this matches the fuel pump.
(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1530.jpg)



15. Use a tie wrap to secure the wires to the mounting plate. Trim excess with diagonal cutters.

(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1533.jpg)

16. Remove any tools and fuel soaked rags.

17. Reconnect battery.

18. Start car and check for leaks.

19. Stop car. Push mounting plate back up. Secure with two 12mm bolts.
(IMG:http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a170/Night_Sailor/Volvo%20240%20Fule%20Filter/Volvo240FuelFilter1534.jpg)

20. Job done.
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
robert240
post May 13 2011, 10:14 AM
Post #2


Veteran
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 1,628
Joined: 2-August 07
Member No.: 30,857
Status: Offline
Location: idaho
Drives: 86 240



very nice! (IMG:style_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif)
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
NightSailor
post May 22 2011, 12:00 AM
Post #3


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 26
Joined: 31-May 10
Member No.: 73,465
Status: Offline
Location: ISA
Drives: 1992 Volvo 240



Forgot to mention I clamped the fuel line with a vise grip.

Also, FCP Groton has the short fuel line for $32.

I just bought one and a new fuel pump. I'm going back to add those to my wagon. I also bought the long fuel line between the filter and the engine.

I plan to replace the last bit of fuel line between the tank and the fuel pump later when I replace the tank with a larger custom tank. I will probably replace the in-tank pump and injector seals to complete my fuel system update later on.
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
Maxy
post Jun 4 2011, 03:47 AM
Post #4


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: 2-June 11
Member No.: 90,275
Status: Offline
Location: USA
Drives: Volvo V40



From the bottom of the filter, monitoring the fuel line until it meets the first bracket that holds in the transport, use of 10 mm socket to remove the "tar" of the bolt.
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
str8tlk
post Jun 14 2011, 11:38 AM
Post #5


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 30
Joined: 13-January 09
Member No.: 51,004
Status: Offline
Location: USA
Drives: 1996 volvo 850R



(IMG:style_emoticons/default/clap.gif) Really nice write up!
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
Maxy
post Jun 15 2011, 01:34 AM
Post #6


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 59
Joined: 2-June 11
Member No.: 90,275
Status: Offline
Location: USA
Drives: Volvo V40



was as simple as disengaged, remove and install a new one. There is a suspension strap around the filter itself, and a clip of the pressure in the inlet and outlet. Cancel the front lines, because it is easier with the strap attached. If your concern about the fuel pressure, disconnect the negative battery cable and under the hood on the fuel rail to release the pressure from the Schrader valve. Do not release pressure
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
Tinkerbell
post Jul 15 2011, 06:50 PM
Post #7


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 38
Joined: 16-February 06
Member No.: 11,869
Status: Offline
Location: Colorado, USA
Drives: 1982 245



Thank you for the wonderful explanation! I recently realized that my 82 wagon was somewhat overdue for a fuel filter change. I lacked the ummm, upper body strength to remove the old one and enlisted the help of a neighbor mechanic. Unfortunately I had damaged the flexible feed line that runs from the rear of the filter joins to a metal line, runs under the car and up to the engine.

Ford being unable to stand the idea of cars built run more than a million miles has included fuel lines in the list of products no longer manufactured. My local independent Volvo shop was unable to help me. The local dealer located what was supposedly the last line in stock in the US, to the tune of $140 plus. Unfortunately it wasn't the right line for my car, they did take back thankfully. The standard auto parts stores didn't have anything that would work. A hose manufacturer in the city didn't either. My brilliant neighbor suggested a race car supply and they had appropriate flexible hose.

The big but is that it leaks fuel between the banjo fitting on the filter and the hose end. The fitting is on tight, the only way to remove it from the hose will be to cut it. My regular Volvo mechanic says in over 30 years he's never known a banjo fitting to crack and leak. The race car guy thinks it must be a crack as he says there is no way fuel is getting between the fitting and the line. The dealer parts manager tells me I can't order just the banjo fitting, I have to take a hose with it for $45.

Any ideas how a lady and her beloved Volvo can resolve this and get back on the road? This has been dragging on for month now!

Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
Tinkerbell
post Jul 15 2011, 06:55 PM
Post #8


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 38
Joined: 16-February 06
Member No.: 11,869
Status: Offline
Location: Colorado, USA
Drives: 1982 245



A few details; the car is a 1982 built 10/81
It has the B21F engine, Calif emissions
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
cal55
post Jul 18 2011, 06:43 AM
Post #9


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 31
Joined: 15-May 06
Member No.: 14,732
Status: Offline
Location: LaGrange Highlands,IL
Drives: 1998 C70



Very nice write up and taking the time for pictures. You have more patience than me. I changed my filter last summer and thought beforehand it can't be that hard to change a filter. Boy was I wrong,I tried to un-bolt the strap holding the front of the bracket on and twisted it pretty bad. Definitely soak that bolt with a penetrant before removing.I like your idea of unbolting the 2 rear bolts and letting it hang by the strap. I replaced the fuel hose going from the pump to the tank because it felt very spongey, it was easier than I thought it would be. I had to replace my fuel sending unit in the tank so that's when I changed the hose. It's hard finding 12mm fuel hose though,I found some on ebay from England. I guess you can use 1/2" hose also.Thanks for taking the time to do this I'm sure it will help someone in the future.
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
thefamilyman
post Aug 8 2011, 10:17 PM
Post #10


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 15
Joined: 8-August 11
Member No.: 93,473
Status: Offline
Location: NSW Australia
Drives: 1978 244DL, 1986 240GL



QUOTE (Tinkerbell @ Jul 15 2011, 07:50 PM)
The race car guy thinks it must be a crack as he says there is no way fuel is getting between the fitting and the line. The dealer parts manager tells me I can't order just the banjo fitting, I have to take a hose with it for $45.

Any ideas how a lady and her beloved Volvo can resolve this and get back on the road? This has been dragging on for month now!


I'm probably too late, but I just joined here. (So I couldn't reply earlier.) There are four copper washers spaced between the fittings. The two with wider walls go to the rear of the filter. The two with narrower walls go to the front of the filter. If someone fits these in the wrong order, the banjo fitting could *seem* to be cracked, due to the washers not sealing correctly and leaking fuel.
Go to the top of the page
 
QuoteReply
« Next Oldest Volvo 240, 242, 244 & 245 Forum Next Newest »
  Advanced Search

1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Reply to this topicStart new topic
Get your Volvo listed in the Garage Today, for FREE, to share with the world what you drive and what toys and modifications you have.

Collapse

> Similar Topics

  Topic Replies Topic Starter Views Last Action
No New Posts Volvo?
Why Volvo?
0 supero 88 23rd September 2014 - 08:33 PM
Last post by: supero
No New Posts Volvo V40 T4 - Knob Safety Lock
5 KONE 1,337 15th September 2014 - 01:49 AM
Last post by: masud ali
No New Posts Volvo 240gl Wagon For Sale Near Perth Wa
Volvo 240GL wagon for sale near Perth WA
0 lee_ricketts1 100 6th September 2014 - 05:43 AM
Last post by: lee_ricketts1
No New Posts Topic has attachmentsVolvo 240gl Wagon For Sale
Selling 240GL
0 lee_ricketts1 223 2nd September 2014 - 10:02 AM
Last post by: lee_ricketts1
No New Posts Only $150/day With Lift And Tool! Diy Garage Happy Hour Deal In September.
0 chrisww 69 31st August 2014 - 07:03 PM
Last post by: chrisww

 
> Link To Us
If you found our site useful please link to us <a href="http://www.volvo-forums.com">Volvo-Forums.com</a>.
 
Time is now: 1st October 2014 - 05:16 AM
© 2004 Volvo-forums.com
Volvo-Forums.com is not affiliated with or endorsed by Volvo Car Corporation.
Privacy Statement